Boston Art Commission

Robert Gould Shaw and the 54th Regiment (1897)
Augustus Saint-Gaudens
Bronze, marble and granite
Boston Common, at Beacon St. and Park St.

Air pollution, extreme weather and temperatures, vandalism, human and animal interaction, and simple dust and dirt all combine to harm precious works of public art throughout the city.  In the over one-hundred years since the Boston Art Commission was founded, it has increasingly collaborated with professional conservators to preserve and protect its collection for the enjoyment of current and future generations.  In addition, the Commission works with artists and communities to ensure that future works of public art are created with long-term maintenance and preservation concerns in mind.

While works of art in granite or marble may require little more than annual cleanings and occasional removal of graffiti, monuments in bronze have presented maintenance challenges to the Art Commission for decades.  Harsh treatments like chemical stripping and sandblasting, once considered the best means to remove dirt and corrosive elements from the surface of bronze works, have since been replaced by more gentle and reversible tactics that include light abrasion, pressure washing, and application of protective coatings of resin or wax.

Read on to find out more on specific conservation efforts currently underway for public art in the City.  Learn about the massive restoration process that priceless works of art in Faneuil Hall are undergoing, and find out how to get involved in the Art Commission's conservation mission through the City’s Adopt-A-Statue campaign.

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Adopt-A-Statue

Become a part of Boston history!

Faneuil Hall Project

Faneuil Hall is among the nation’s oldest and most important buildings.