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Dorchester Heights Monument

Artist:

Peabody and Stearns

Location:

Thomas Park  

Location

Thomas Park
United States
42° 19' 58.3608" N, 71° 2' 46.4172" W

Neighborhood:

Dorchester

Type:

Memorial Sculpture

Year:

1902

Medium:

Marble

Collection:

National Park Service

Funders:

the Commonwealth of Massachusetts

Description:

In contrast with Bunker Hill, Dorchester Heights is famous for a battle that never happened. In 1776, controlling the Heights would give any force that occupied it command of British-held Boston and its harbor. On March 4, Continental troops led by George Washington fortified the Heights and emplaced cannon that could fire on the city. Under that threat, the British General Howe had to decide between attacking Dorchester Heights or abandoning Boston. He chose to withdraw his forces; on March 17, the British departed for Canada, and Boston was free. Boston and surrounding Suffolk County celebrate the date each year as Evacuation Day. To commemorate the importance of Dorchester Heights in the Revolutionary War, the Commonwealth of Massachusetts erected a white marble tower in the Colonial style on the part of the heights known as Telegraph Hill. The tower is 125 feet tall; the panoramic view from the top certifies the Heights’s military importance. It was designed by the architects, Peabody and Stearns, and completed in 1902.

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