Boston Art Commission

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Click on thumbnails to view additional images of this piece:
  • LandWave, artist team Gillies-Smith/KilKelly, Cormier, led by Shauna Gillies-Smith, 2011
  • LandWave, artist team Gillies-Smith/KilKelly, Cormier, led by Shauna Gillies-Smith, 2011
  • LandWave, artist team Gillies-Smith/KilKelly, Cormier, led by Shauna Gillies-Smith, 2011
  • LandWave, artist team Gillies-Smith/KilKelly, Cormier, led by Shauna Gillies-Smith, 2011
  • LandWave, artist team Gillies-Smith/KilKelly, Cormier, led by Shauna Gillies-Smith, 2011
  • LandWave, artist team Gillies-Smith/KilKelly, Cormier, led by Shauna Gillies-Smith, 2011
  • LandWave, artist team Gillies-Smith/KilKelly, Cormier, led by Shauna Gillies-Smith, 2011

LandWave

Artist:

Shauna Gillies-Smith / Michael Kilkelly / France Cormier artist team led by Shauna Gillies-Smith

Location:

Peters Park, Washington St. and South Berkeley Street  

Location

Peters Park, Washington St. and South Berkeley Street
United States
42° 20' 36.9384" N, 71° 3' 59.4036" W

Neighborhood:

South End

Type:

Sculptural Landscape

Year:

2011

Medium:

Mixed media

Collection:

Funders:

Description:

LandWave is an art installation built on a linear strip of land between the Peters Park baseball field and the Washington Street sidewalk in the South End. The artwork, a combination of hardscape and landscape, follows the historic edge of the Neck, the narrow isthmus that once connected the Shawmut Peninsula (now downtown Boston) to the mainland. LandWave celebrates the dual history of the site, as well as the ever-changing landscape of the City. On the side of the waves that faces Washington Street, blue tiles spill over the surface, creating a reflective “ocean.” The other side of the wave is blanketed with mulch and grass to represent "land". At night the crest of the wave, which is lined with soft, blue, LED bulbs, lights up. 

That long narrow strip of land properly called “The Neck” … stretched away like a ribbon of varying width to the main land. Vastly different, however, to its present aspect was its condition in those early days when the road which traversed it was well-nigh impassable in the spring, when the horses waded knee-deep in water at full tides, when the only timber upon the whole peninsula grew upon the Neck, and the marshes on either hand were the favorite hunting-ground of the sportsman.

The Memorial History of Boston, 1630-1880

For more information please visit www.landwave.org.

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