Boston Art Commission

Check out these temporary projects. To propose a temporary public art project of your own, download the guidelines and apply!

Sun Boxes

Artist: Craig Colorusso

Neighborhood: Downtown Boston

Location:  

Medium:

Time Frame: Thursday, September 18, 2014 - Sunday, September 21, 2014

Description:

Sun Boxes are travailing solar powered sound installation. It’s comprised of twenty speakers operating independently, each powered by the sun via solar panels. There is a different loop set to play a guitar note in each box continuously. These guitar notes collectively make a Bb chord. Because the loops are different in length, once the piece begins they continually overlap and the piece slowly evolves over time.

The scheduled installation dates for Sun Boxes are as follows:

Copley Square, Thursday, September 18, 10:30 am-sundown

Dewey Square, Rose Kennedy Greenway, Friday, September 19, 10:30 am-sundown

Boston Common, Saturday, September 20, 10:30 am-sundown

The Children's Museum, Fort Point, Sunday, September 21, 10:30 am-sundown

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Tropical Fort Point

Artist: Peter Agoos

Neighborhood: Fort Point

Location:  

Medium: Floating art installation

Time Frame: Monday, April 28, 2014 - Sunday, June 15, 2014

Description:

“The struggle for quality public open space in the neighborhood and the likelihood of climate change-induced rising sea levels are the conceptual parents of Tropical Fort Point.  Inspired in part by seeing the Sudbury River at spring flood turning the adjacent wetland woods into wooded wetlands—trees apparently growing out of a lake, with an occasional canoe or kayak slipping between the trunks — the concept was initially planned as an evergreen installation called Fort Point Forest.  The design evolved to embrace the low centers of gravity, salt-resistance, and wind-shedding characteristics of Majesty Palms and grew the new title of Tropical Fort Point.  This tongue–in–cheek preview of the effect of rising tides stakes a claim to the Channel wetscape as an unexploited green space.”  - Peter Agoos

Agoos is a long-time Fort Point resident, the creator of the 2012 suspended installation Arts Imbalance between the Summer and Congress Street bridges, creative director for the 100th anniversary illuminations of the Boston Children’s Museum in fall 2013, and with Diane Fiedler, creator of C is for Clamp on view at BCM as part of the multi-artist installations known as An Alphabet of Inspiration: Artists Celebrate 100 Years of Collections.

Tropical Fort Point will be located in the Fort Point Channel basin between the Congress and Summer Street Bridges. The installation will be on display from April 28th – June 15th.  An expanded public art series is planned for May, with three additional installations to be announced around the Fort Point Channel.

Tropical Fort Point and the Spring Public Art Series are held in conjunction with Fort Point Spring Open Studios Weekend, to be held Friday through Sunday, May 9-11th. During Open Studios, more than 75 artists will open their studio doors to the public. Studios will be open Friday evening from 4-7pm, and Saturday and Sunday from 12-5pm. Open Studios visitors will explore the neighborhood and go inside the historic Fort Point warehouse lofts to meet local artists, including: painters, sculptors, ceramicists, jewelers, performance artists, fashion designers, printmakers, book artists, photographers, and more. Artwork will be available for purchase directly from the artists.

Fort Point Open Studios events are free and open to the public.  Free parking during Open Studios is available.  A downloadable map and details of Fort Point Open Studios will be found on www.fortpointarts.org

Open Studios and the Public Art Series are organized by Fort Point Arts Community (FPAC), which represents over 300 artists in all media working and living in this unique waterfront neighborhood. Fort Point is recognized as one of New England’s largest established arts communities.  Peter Agoos. For more information on the Fort Point Arts Community visit www.fortpointarts.org.

Tropical Fort Point and Fort Point’s Floating Art Series is made possible by the generous support Friends of Fort Point Channel, a nonprofit organization committed to making the Fort Point Channel an exciting and welcoming destination for all of Boston's residents, workforce and visitors. For more information, please visit www.friendsoffortpointchannel.org. Friends of Fort Point Channel has partnered with The Fort Point Arts Community since 2005 to activate the Fort Point Channel with temporary displays of public art.

Additional support for Tropical Fort Point is provided by a grant from the Fort Point Channel Operations Board with funds from the Chapter 91 Waterways Regulations License #11419 for Russia Wharf, now Atlantic Wharf. The Fort Point Channel Operations Board is made up of representatives from the City of Boston, the Executive Office of Energy and Environmental Affairs, and the Fort Point Channel Abutters Group, who oversee the implementation of public benefits required from private development along the Fort Point Channel.

Photo credit: @MetroBosMike

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Dear Boston: Messages from the Marathon Memorial

Artist:

Neighborhood:

Location: Boston Public Library  

Location

Boston Public Library
United States
42° 20' 58.7364" N, 71° 4' 37.5636" W

Medium:

Time Frame: Monday, April 7, 2014 - Sunday, May 11, 2014

Description:

The tragic events of April 15th, 2013 resulted immediately in an outpouring of support by first responders, runners, the local community and well-wishers from around the world. Almost immediately, a makeshift memorial began to take shape, first at the police barricade at the intersection of Boylston and Berkeley Streets and later at Copley Square. People from across the globe left flowers, posters, notes, t-shirts, hats, tokens of all shapes and sizes, and—most significantly—running shoes.

Each of the objects left at the memorial, whether giant banner or tiny scrap of paper, store-bought or handmade, was a message of love and support for grieving families and a grieving city. They were hope in material form, symbolizing the human desire to help, comfort, connect, and sustain when confronted with great tragedy.

In June 2013, the memorial was dismantled and these thousands of objects were transferred to the Boston City Archives for safekeeping. To mark the one year anniversary, a selection of items from the memorial collection will be displayed—in one of Boston’s most important civic buildings—so visitors can once again experience the outpouring of human compassion they represent.

Dear Boston has been organized by a partnership that includes the Boston City Archives, the Boston Art Commission, the New England Museum Association, and the Boston Public Library. It has been made possible with the generous support of Iron Mountain.

Related Programs and Events

The BPL is hosting a series of programs and events in April to commemorate this important anniversary. Please visit the Boston Marathon Programs page to learn more.

The Museum of Fine Arts, Boston (MFA), will open its doors on Saturday, April 19, 2014 for a free To Boston With Love Community Day—an opportunity for families in Boston and beyond to enjoy a day of art and fellowship. The Institute of Contemporary Art will also host a free day on Tuesday, April 15th. 

Many other organizations throughout the Greater Boston area are hosting commemorative events:  the BostonBetter blog includes listings and more information on programs, schedules, and participating institutions.

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Art on the Marquee

Artist: Various artists

Neighborhood:

Location: Boston Convention & Exhibition Center  

Location

Boston Convention & Exhibition Center
415 Summer Street, Boston
Boston, MA
United States

Medium:

Time Frame: Thursday, March 20, 2014 - Wednesday, December 31, 2014

Description:

Boston Cyberarts and the Massachusetts Convention Center Authority have teamed up to create “Art on the Marquee,” an ongoing project to commission public media art for display on the new 80-foot-tall multi-screen LED marquee outside the Boston Convention & Exhibition Center in South Boston. The largest urban screen in New England, this unique digital canvas is one of the first of its kind in the U.S. to integrate art alongside commercial and informational content as part of the MCCA’s longstanding neighborhood art program.

The inaugural exhibition, opening March 20th, 2014, will feature seven new digital artworks from local Massachusetts artists including: Jeff Bartell & Fish McGill, Trashteroids, Reginald Arlen DeCambre, Permanence on the Sand, Ryan Dight, Reconsider, Lina Maria Giraldo, Up, James Manning, Dirty Pixels, Eben McCue, Super Life, and Jeff Warmouth, Human Testbrix

For more information, visit the artonthemarquee.com.

 

Photo Credit: Evan Richman/ MCAA

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Starry Night

Artist: Lisa Greenfield and Daniel J. van Ackere

Neighborhood:

Location: Fort Point  

Location

Fort Point
United States
42° 20' 58.29" N, 71° 2' 56.4288" W

Medium:

Time Frame: Saturday, December 21, 2013 - Thursday, December 21, 2023

Description:

Starting in late 2013, the Summer Street underpass at A Street will be illuminated by a net of brilliant, twinkling blue LEDs. This project was first installed in 2010 for several months, and following its joyful reception by the local community, the artists undertook a longer lasting installation in the same location. In addition to adding beauty and whimsy to an often overlooked public space, Starry Night will provide visibility and safety to the area. 

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The Art of Hope

Artist: Derek Smith

Neighborhood: Back Bay

Location:  

Location

United States
42° 21' 1.872" N, 71° 4' 31.3212" W

Medium: Mural

Time Frame: Friday, October 25, 2013 - Sunday, October 27, 2013

Description:

How do we respond peacefully to violence in our lives?  In our communities? Do we passively accept it?  Do we fuel the cycle with our own anger?  Artists Derek “Focus” Smith from the Pine Ridge Reservation, South Dakota, and Aaron “AMP” Pearcy of Rapid City, SD, have been actively exploring the question of how to make and use art to respond peacefully to violence.  Trinity is honored to host them when, over a weekend, these artists will create a temporary mural as a statement of peace, hope and love over violence, despair and hatred.  They will be creating live, outside Trinity Church, all three days.  Stop by each day to see the work evolve!

The artists will be painting from Friday, October 25 through Sunday, October 27, 10am – 4:30pm, outside Trinity Church's west porch

A concluding reception will be held Sunday, October 27, from 4:30pm – 5:30pm

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Stop Telling Women to Smile

Artist: Tatyana Fazlailzadeh

Neighborhood: East Boston and Roxbury

Location: Harbor Arts in East Boston and Bartlett Yards in Roxbury  

Location

Harbor Arts in East Boston and Bartlett Yards in Roxbury
2532 Washington Street
Boston, MA
United States

Medium: Wheatpaste posters

Time Frame: Friday, October 18, 2013 - Tuesday, December 31, 2013

Description:

Stop Telling Women to Smile is a public art series that addresses gender based street harassment. The work consists of drawn portraits of women who have told their stories of harassment, and wheat pasting those portraits as posters with captions that speak directly to offenders on outdoor walls. The artist will be bringing this project to the streets of Boston in mid October of 2013. 

During her time here, Fazlalizadeh will be interviewing local women about their experiences with street harassment. After photographing the chosen participants and drawing their portraits, Fazlalizadeh will strategically deploy these city-specific signs on the streets of Boston. These signs serve as a symbolic reclamation of public space as well as a declaration that women are not sexual objects for public consumption, but citizens worthy of respect.

Fazlailzadeh will be returning to Boston in the coming months to put up new posters in even more locations around Boston. As of now, her work can be seen in Central Square in Cambridge, at Harbor Arts in East Boston, and at Barlett Yards in Roxbury

To learn more about Tatyana Fazlailzadeh, visit her website at tlynnfaz.com/

For more information on Stop Telling Women to Smile and to follow the artist on her national tour, check out stoptellingwomentosmile.com

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Remanence: Salt and Light

Artist: Matthew Ritchie

Neighborhood: Dewey Square

Location:  

Location

United States
42° 21' 12.8196" N, 71° 3' 16.2216" W

Medium:

Time Frame: Monday, September 16, 2013 - Monday, December 1, 2014

Description:

A 70' x 70' painted mural by Matthew Ritchie will cover the existing mural on the Dewey Square Air Intake Structure. 

The artist, from New York, will have an exhibition at the Institute of Contemporary Art/Boston next year from April 2014 - February 2015 and has designed an accompanying public mural for the Dewey Square AIS to be installed in September 2013 in advance of the exhibition. 

The title of the piece is Remanence: Salt and Light, diagrams turn into spheres rising from the sea, turn back into atoms, that then, in turn, become pure ideas.  Remanence is a cross between memory, remnant and resonance. The Parable of Salt and Light, from the Sermon on the Mount (Matthew 5:13-16) was cited by John Winthrop, first governor of the Massachusetts Bay Colony on the deck of the Arabella, as well as by both Presidents John F. Kennedy and Ronald Reagan. The famous comparison of wasted salt and the city on a hill has become a remanence of an idea. Remanence (or remanent magnetization) is technically the magnetization left behind in a ferromagnetic material (such as iron) after an external magnetic field is removed.
The mural project also supports a unique musical and informational space, with music by Bryce Dessner and a short film by Matthew Ritchie, accessible by all wireless devices. Accompanying this mural is a series of scaling works; a drawing, a painting, a performance, an illuminated window, a wall drawing, a film and a song cycle by Matthew Ritchie to be shown at the ICA Boston over the next year. A new kind of shared space emerges, built from our engagement with images and ideas, real and implied information, formalized physical space and movement. Passersby can dive as deeply as they want into this body of work, but no matter how many times they walk through the garden, no matter how many times they listen to the music, there will always be an aspect they cannot see, a new story emerging.  
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Pulse of the City

Artist: George Zisiadis

Neighborhood: 5 Locations

Location:  

Location

United States

Medium:

Time Frame: Friday, September 6, 2013 - Friday, September 5, 2014

Description:

 

Pulse of the City is an exciting new interactive work that made its debut in five locations throughout Boston in early Suptember, 2013. Citizens are encouraged to step up to the bright red, metallic hearts and grab onto the handles protruding from either side. The participant's heartbeat is then processed into music, resulting in a one-minute interactive concert that changes with each person who touches it. 

Locations around Boston include Christopher Columbus Park in the North End (down for the time being, but returning soon); East Boston Neighborhood Health Center in Maverick Square; Ashmont Station in Dorchester; along the circle at Avenue Louis Pasteur in Longwood; and in front of the Reggie Lewis Athletic Center in Roxbury.

George Zisiadis, a San Francisco based artist, is the creative force behind the solar-powered music boxes. These playful sculptures encourage us to break from the rush of urban life and take a moment to play, to marvel, and to appreciate the world around and inside of us.

Phtoto: “Pulse of the City.” (Courtesy of George Zisiadis)

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Dandelion Twins

Artist: Nate Swain

Neighborhood: Beacon Hill

Location:  

Location

United States
42° 21' 35.0532" N, 71° 7' 18.7068" W

Medium: House Paint

Time Frame: Thursday, August 1, 2013 - Friday, August 1, 2014

Description:

The two advertisement billboards on Cambridge Street were transformed into two murals in five days, and installed in two hours. They are the first murals painted on Beacon Hill. Each mural painted on vinyl over advertisements and is 25-ft wide by 37-ft tall. Painted in 32 hours. Nate hopes the images are able to make people smile.

(This piece has been taken down temporarily but should be back up in a couple months!)

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Phases

Artist: Sophia Brueckner and Catherine D'Ignazio

Neighborhood: Greenway

Location:  

Location

United States
42° 21' 34.74" N, 71° 3' 6.0876" W

Medium:

Time Frame: Monday, July 8, 2013 - Saturday, August 1, 2015

Description:

Phases is a new generative art installation by Sophia Brueckner and Catherine D'Ignazio, created for the Boston Harbor Islands Pavilion located in Boston's Rose Kennedy Greenway. The Pavilion is the Welcome Center for the Boston Harbor Islands national park area. Starting Monday, July 8th and running only after sunset, the animation renders moonlight sparkling on ocean waves receding into the nighttime darkness. It is purposefully reminiscent of the condensed landscapes in early computer games where the complexity of nature is distilled into such a small number of pixels, analogous to modern difficulties in reducing complex real-world environments and situations into simple metrics computers can understand.

The animation is alive, and the computer program pulls information in real-time regarding the conditions of the Boston Harbor Islands to influence the constantly evolving animation. The tides affect the shape and speed of the overlapping and receding patterns. The middle column of light changes with the phases of the moon. Weather conditions affect the beams of light moving across the scene, and, on clear nights, flickering pixels emulate the glitter of light on water. While bringing awareness to the challenge of capturing real-world complexities using limited representations within the computer, Phases uses technology to link two places together in real-time, bringing a little bit of the Boston Harbor Islands to the city.

Programming for the low-resolution LED screens at the Pavilion is sponsored by the National Park Service and Boston Harbor Island Alliance. The programming content, curated by Boston Cyberarts, is designed to enliven a focal point of the Greenway after dark with themes that connect the viewer to the islands-based park 15 minutes from downtown Boston.

Text and photo provided by Boston Cyberarts. More information is available at bostoncyberarts.org

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Art Barrier: 137.5°

Artist: Benjamin Winters and Vaclav Sipla

Neighborhood: Fort Point & Charlestown

Location:  

Location

United States
42° 21' 13.896" N, 71° 2' 52.2096" W

Medium: Exterior Grade Acrylic

Time Frame: Friday, April 26, 2013 - Wednesday, April 1, 2020

Description:

Mayor Thomas M. Menino and the Boston Art Commission, in collaboration with the City of Boston's Public Works Department, are pleased to announce ArtBarrier, a new program, which will add color and vitality to the often-overlooked concrete Jersey barriers located on public roadways.

The winning design, entitled 137.5°, is by Benjamin Winters and Vaclav Sipla. The artists have engaged in a range of projects throughout the region and brought their combined innovation and creativity to the ArtBarrier program. Benjamin Winters is a designer concerned with the potential for creating identity and space through returning decorative ornaments to the public setting. Vaclav Sipla is a classically trained stone sculptor who cofounded Sipla Newsam Studio, an art studio concerned with site specific public art whose philosophy has been described as urban Zen.

The artists describe their design as “a stylized version of a sunflower, created using mathematics and computer drafting software. The sunflower is a plant native to the area, and is often viewed as a symbol of optimism, as the faces of the mature plant face Eastward towards the rising sun. It also contains a natural expression of the golden ratio, thought by some to be relayed to beauty”.

Winters and Sipla created stencils that were used by volunteers to paint the barriers, as part of the annual Boston Shines volunteer program on Friday April 26th and Saturday April 27th at Northern Avenue and North Washington Street. 

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Bartlett Yard Events

Artist: Various

Neighborhood: Dudley Square

Location:  

Location

United States
42° 19' 39.504" N, 71° 5' 13.902" W

Medium: Various

Time Frame: Monday, April 1, 2013 - Tuesday, April 1, 2014

Description:

Bartlett Yard, is Roxbury's newest destination for arts, culture, and community. Bartlett Yard is the site of the former MBTA Bartlett Bus Yard and the future home of Bartlett Place, a major new residential and retail development in Roxbury.  The total site area is approximately 8.6 acres.  The northern half of the site is presently leased to a construction company.  This leaves approximately 3 acres of open outdoor space in a unique "puzzle-piece" configuration.  Far from being limiting, the uniqueness of this space opens the door for many types of events.  Bartlett Yard is the home of a variety of art, retail, and special events hosted by Alliger Arts, Nuestra Communidad, Windale Development Corporation, and a variety of community non-profit partners.

This series of events is being organized by Jason Turgeon, a resident of the Highland Park neighborhood, known for organizing the annual FIGMENT Boston art event on the Rose Kennedy Greenway and writing the hyper-local Fort Hill History blog. He is working in collaboration with Jeremy Alliger of Alliger Arts, a stalwart of Boston's art and dance scenes and has organized events at nearby venues including Hibernian Hall and Mark Paulo Ramos Matel, a Rose Fellow, a native of Virginia and most recently lived in Alabama and New Orleans. Mark has a background in design/architecture and has fabricated object of beauty ranging from furniture to street art. They are working with site development team Nuestra Communidad/Windale Development Inc.,

For more information about specific events each weekend visit: http://bartlettevents.org/

Image courtesy of Bartlettevents.org

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Cycles, Tides and Seasons

Artist: Ben Houge

Neighborhood: Downtown

Location: Boston Harbor Island Pavilion on the Rose F. Kennedy Greenway  

Location

Boston Harbor Island Pavilion on the Rose F. Kennedy Greenway
United States

Medium: Video Installation

Time Frame: Thursday, May 31, 2012 - Saturday, May 31, 2014

Description:

The National Park Service and the Boston Harbor Island Alliance have teamed up with Boston Cyberarts to create a two year art program calling for artists to make work for the two low-resolution screens at the Harbor Island Pavilion on the Greenway Conservancy. This exciting new endeavor will enliven the Greenway in the evening, while promoting the creative innovation of the region. While the Harbor Island Pavilion displays are approximately 6 x 8 feet, they have a resolution of only 48 x 64 pixels, which is not suitable for recognizable video imagery. Therefore, Boston Cyberarts has decided to commission various algorithmic artists to write programs that will create real time generative art that constantly changes.

In an effort to directly relate to the Harbor Islands themselves, the commissioned artists will draw from the National Park’s geographic information system (GIS) databases as a source, but the work will be abstract in nature. This program ties into the innovative strengths of the Boston area, using digital art algorithms to heighten the interest in Boston Harbor’s history and natural complex ecosystems.

The first work commissioned for the program is Cycles, Tides, and Seasons, by Cambridge-based artist Ben Houge. Houge is a algorithmic artist, composer and sound artist. His areas of activity range from computer game design and soundtracks to sacred choral music. Recently, he was artist in residence at the MIT Media Lab and teaches video game music in the Film Scoring Department at Berklee College of Music.

Read more about the programming here: http://bostoncyberarts.org/category/specialproject/

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International HarborArts Outdoor Gallery at Boston Harbor Shipyard

Artist: Various

Neighborhood: East Boston

Location: Boston Harbor Shipyard on the Boston HarborWalk  

Location

Boston Harbor Shipyard on the Boston HarborWalk
United States
42° 21' 48.9096" N, 71° 1' 58.8216" W

Medium: Various

Time Frame:

Description:

Organized by HarborArts in partnership with the Urban Arts Institute at Massachusetts College of Art and Design. HarborArts is a global community bringing people together to champion the vital role our oceans, waterways and harbors play in the future of our planet. The Boston Harbor Shipyard is a 14-acre working shipyard featuring the HarborArts Outdoor Gallery with large-scale 2D and 3D works by over 30 artists / teams from three continents. Exhibiting artists include B. Amore, Ralph Berger, David Chatowsky, Louisa Conrad, Robert Craig, Konstantin Dimopoulos, Marisa DiPaola, Gary Duehr, Margaret Evangeline, Mark Favermann, James Fuhrman, Donald Gerola, Gunnar Gundersen with Julia Jacoby and students from Høgskole i Akershus, Elizabeth Hack, Lisa Hein & Robert Seng, Paul Howe, Matt Evald Johnson, Annetta Kapon, Stacy Levy, Carolyn Lewenberg, Mark Millstein, Caitlin Nesbit, Lori Nozick, Trace O'Connor, Bayne Peterson, Kimberly Radochia, Derek Riley, Karl Saliter, Paul Lloyd Sargent, and Maayke Schurer. HarborArts employs the arts to raise awareness for issues affecting our water resources. HarborArts is featuring the Massachusetts Ocean Coalition and information about the member organizations, highlighting their important environmental work on the Massachusetts Ocean Plan.

Open year-round. Recommended viewing hours Mon-Fri, 3:30pm–sunset & Sat-Sun, 9am–sunset.

http://www.harborarts.net

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